Coaches: Level Up with Your Players – PCA

http://positivecoach.org/the-pca-blog/coaches-level-up-with-your-players/

Another good article from the good folks at the Positive Coaching Alliance (PCA).  I think these recommendations are fantastic.  I have been sharing the ‘get down on their level physically’ in my clinics.  I’m not sure about the recommendation to hold their heads, though.  I would be careful about that one.  I’d also add that the coach should work hard to learn the players’ names as soon as possible.  It makes a difference when a coach refers to the child by name as opposed to ‘buddy’ or ‘little guy’.

Should Your Child Specialize in One Sport?

Sports specialization in youth sports is a hot topic.  I came across an article in USA Today’s High School Sports section highlighting that 30 of the 32 first round picks in the last week’s NFL draft played multiple sports in high school.  While reading the article, there were links to two others on the subject.  One that presented the data from an NCAA survey of over 21,000 Division I, II, and III athletes.  The other presented results from research that indicated that single sport athletes were twice as likely to suffer a lower-body injury than multi-sport athletes.  What does the Hustle & Attitude philosophy say about the subject.

 


 

What do Hustle & Attitude parents and coaches do with respect to sports specialization?

Recall that the Hustle & Attitude (H&A)  philosophy is a youth recreational sports philosophy.  This implies that it is not conducive to sports specialization in that the typical specialization scenario – at least in the team sports like baseball, basketball, soccer, lacrosse, etc. – is that the child plays for the local (often school-affiliated) team in season and then for a travel or select team in the off-season.  This often makes for a year-round commitment to the sport.  [As an aside, my friend’s son – and his family – have worked hard to play school and select soccer and school and select baseball leading up to and all through high school.  In a sense, he ‘specialized’ in two sports!]  Given the typical scenario, H&A parents and coaches wouldn’t have the choice about specialization because they would be involved in rec leagues.

In light of the benefits of playing multiple sports espoused in the “Few Surprises” article:

  • Less potential for burnout
  • Accumulating cross sport skills, and
  • Reducing overuse injuries – think pitchers in baseball, see John Smoltz’s recommendation – or injuries at all as the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health study indicates)

It would seem playing in rec leagues (or finding corresponding in-season and off-season sports like my friend’s son did) would be recommended.  [Although, truth in advertising, my friend’s son did have Tommy John surgery to repair his elbow during his junior year at the age of 17.]  The core of the H&A philosophy is to provide positive youth recreational sports experiences for our children.  Although many H&A families wouldn’t be faced with the question because their child wouldn’t be playing on a travel or select team, I could see, and indeed have seen, children and families that have had positive experiences while specializing in one sport.   [To close these parenthetical asides about my friend and his son; I don’t think he or his parents regret ‘specializing’ in soccer and baseball for the last 6-7 years, even considering the Tommy John surgery.]

So long as the child is having a positive experience, perhaps specialization is OK.  However, my personal belief is that playing more sports is beneficial to the development of our kids.


I need to get on a little rant here (anyone remember Dennis Miller’s show on HBO?)…

We need to stop using college and professional football players as our examples of why kids don’t need to specialize in sports in order to succeed (where the general public definition of success is getting a scholarship).  The USA Today articles highlight the NFL draft picks and how Ohio State football coach Urban Meyer has repeatedly said he only recruits multi-sport athletes.  Well, duh!  It should not come as a surprise to anyone that college-level football players played multiple sports in high school.  To make it to the collegiate level in football, the young men were obviously very athletic.  Unlike the sports I mentioned above in the specialization scenarios, there is no travel or select football.  I know, I know, if you’re reading this in Texas or Alabama, you’re thinking “There ain’t no offseason for football, yankee!”  First of all, I apologize for the gross generalization of how folks from Texas or Alabama talk.  Also, I’m from Arizona and a Red Sox fan, so I’m not a Yankee.  Anyway, I agree there are spring drills, and 7-on-7 and passing leagues in the spring/summer.  However, think about it; even with the offseason football activities, there is ample time for these high-caliber athletes to play other sports competitively.  As the data in the USA Today article indicates, track and field and basketball are high on the list of sports football players also play.  And based on my high school experience and watching my boys’ classmates, I would suggest wrestling is also a natural sport that football players gravitate towards as it is very complimentary of the skills, strength, and endurance required in football.

Let’s stop touting football players as our example of why children shouldn’t specialize in a single sport.  The general concern is not that football players specialize – again, they kind of can’t – it’s the travel and select baseball, basketball, soccer, and lacrosse leagues that offer our kids the opportunity (challenge?) to play one sport year round.  I appreciate the message.  I agree that children shouldn’t feel the need to specialize – certainly before high school.  However, we need examples of baseball, basketball, and/or soccer players who benefited from playing multiple sports.  Stop with the football examples.

Great Musical Tribute to Coaches

Country singer Kenny Chesney is a big football fan.  You may have seen him hanging with Peyton Manning (see the picture of Manning giving Chesney a Country Music Award last November).

Kenny and Peyton

And that’s him getting a hug from New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft in the Patriots box during Super Bowl XLI.Kenny and Kraft He reflected his love for the game in song with ‘Boys of Fall’ (written by Casey Beathard and Dave Turnbull) off his Hemingway’s Whiskey album released in 2010 (here’s the story behind the song and the video).  His latest album Cosmic Hallelujah includes a touching song that pays tribute to coaches – one Chesney cowrote with Beathard.  Here are the lyrics:

We loved some and we fought some
We won some and we lost some
We were awful, we were awesome
Weren’t we, coach?
We worked hard, we were lazy
We were heroes, we were babies
Made you proud, and drove you crazy
Didn’t we coach?
All those mottoes, all those reasons, all those rhymes
They stay priceless, they come right back right on time
You were a teacher, a preacher, a mother, a father
A lot less taker than giver
A keeper of secrets and
constantly making believers out of quitters
For all of your time and your heart and soul
you deserve a lot more than a toast
But here’s to you and thanks again
We’ll never forget you coach
The papers loved to hate you
Wasn’t worth near what they paid you
But it never seemed to faze you
Did it, coach?
Those fans could be fair weather
But you kept us all together
Found a way to make us better
Somehow coach
Your door was always open rain or shine
All those hats you wore will always blow my mind
You were a teacher, a preacher, a mother, a father
A lot less taker than giver
A keeper of secrets and
constantly making believers out of quitters
For all of your time and your heart and soul
you deserve a lot more than a toast
But here’s to you and thanks again
We’ll never forget you coach
For all of your time and your heart and soul
you deserve a lot more than a toast
So here’s to you and thanks again
We love you and we’ll hold you in our hearts there with the things that matter most
We’ll never forget you coach
Oh God bless you coach
We’ll never forget you coach
WOW!  Although seemingly geared towards high school coaches (references to the papers and the pay…Chesney talks about the song on ESPN ), there’s a lot there for youth sports coaches, too.  My favorite line is how the coach “found a way to make us better“.  Also, the idea that coaches have the ability to have such an impact on their players that they never forget.  Before they got to high school, I would often run into former players of mine who would call me coach.

Hustle & Attitude is a philosophy dedicated to providing a positive environment for kids in youth sports.  The coach has such an important role in determining whether a season is positive or not.  Done well – following the H&A philosophy…well, you might have a song written about you.

When the Right Strategy is Wrong for Kids

Our friends at GameChanger included an article about a new Little League Baseball rule change in their Season newsletter.  The rule change is related to how intentional walks are handled in Little League.  Specifically, under the new rule, managers will declare they want to intentionally walk the batter and the pitcher will automatically have four pitches added to their pitch count.  This is not immaterial as Little League Baseball has mandatory pitch limits based on the age of the pitchers.  The article describes a situation where a manager in last year’s Little League World Series (of which I have already written about my mixed feelings) denied an intentional walk by instructing his batter to swing.  This was done to get the starting pitcher over his pitch count limit – forcing the opposing manager to replace the pitcher.  The manager who declined the intentional walk is quoted as saying “We’re trying to win” and “It was just strategy“.  It worked in this case as his team rallied against the new pitcher to win the game.  But is it appropriate for kids 11-13 years old?
I have written about my philosophy about youth recreational sports .  Further, in my coaching clinics, I tell the coaches that we are playing to win, but that we’re doing so with other higher priorities.  Specifically, the priorities are that every child plays an equal amount (over the season) and every child gets a chance to play multiple positions (again, over the whole season).  Hustle & Attitude coaches don’t measure the success of their season by wins and losses and tournaments won, but in terms of whether the athletes want to play again the following season.  Within the season, the measure of success is whether each player had fun, learned how to play the game, and got better at playing the game throughout the season.  Does the above situation – denying an intentional walk deliberately to increase an opposing pitcher’s pitch count – fit with the Hustle & Attitude philosophy?  I don’t know that I would go so far as to say it runs contrary to the philosophy, but I know that I wouldn’t have done it.
I appreciate Little League Baseball’s attempts to encourage positive experiences for young baseball players.  They have mandatory playing time rules.  Pitch counts show appropriate concern for the young players’ health.  However, there is still room for coaches to behave poorly.  Specifically, instructing their players to do things that will contribute to the team winning, but are contrary to actually learning how to play the game correctly.  I can remember a game while I was coaching in Marlins Little League Picturethe El Segundo, California Little League where the opposing manager was instructing or encouraging – I’m not sure, but let’s say I know he wasn’t discouraging – his players to just keep running to second on a walk.  The batter would take ball four and then sprint to first base and while the catcher was throwing the ball back to the pitcher, would take a turn and break for second base.  This was an attempt to take advantage of the fact that 8- and 9-year old recreational baseball players have trouble reliably throwing and catching the ball.  The pitcher would have to catch the ball, then turn and successfully throw the ball to the second baseman or shortstop covering at second who would, in turn, have to catch the ball and make a successful tag.  In response to seeing this a couple of times, I instructed my catcher to walk the ball back to the pitcher while staring down the base runner.  Does this sound like baseball to you?  Of course not.  Did the opposing manager’s ‘strategy’ increase his chances of winning?  Sure.  He’d often get a runner in scoring position with each walk.
Strategies like the ones above fit into a mentality that teach the wrong lessons to the children playing the game and often can lead to more insidious strategies like losing on purpose for tournament seeding.  These are not in keeping with a desire to provide a positive experience for the youth participating in sports.  Hustle & Attitude coaches do not coach that way.  Rather than declining an intentional walk, I would recommend the batter take their base and encourage the next batter to do their best to drive the runners in.  Easy for me to say…I’ve never been coaching with a Little League World Series game on the line.  Regardless, I would suggest to you that our team was more successful that year than many of the teams in the Little League World Series any year.  The players had fun.  They learned how to play the game (the appropriate way).  They got better throughout the season.  And, to my recollection, all of them came back to play the following season (many of them requested to play on my team).

1st Time Flag Football Coaches Found My Clinic Very Useful

FFF Coaching Spring Clinics

Last month I held six clinics for Flag Football Fanatics coaches in the Columbus, Dayton, and Cincinnati areas.  46 coaches participated in the clinics covering all aspects of coaching in the Flag Football Fanatics league.

I sent a survey to the coaches that participated.  78% of those responding to the survey indicated the material was Very Useful to them.  The overall average response to the question asking the coaches to rate the usefulness of the information on a scale of 1-5 (‘Not Useful’ to ‘Incredibly Useful’) was 4.02 (‘Very Useful’).

FurSpring Clinic Pic 1ther, first year Flag Football Fanatics coaches (my target audience with the Hustle & Attitude clinics) scored the clinics 4.15, taking a particular liking to the discussions concerning the Equipment and dealing with parents and referees.  Coaches who were coaching youth recreational sports for the first time found the clinics even more useful – their scores averaging 4.67!


One coach left this feedback:  “It was a really good session. You have great perspective about the purpose of rec sports and how to talk and encourage kids (get down on one knee and not coaching my kid different than others). Good humor and you helped me get my head around the big picture of coaching kids. It was time well spent – I would recommend to any new coach”.


This is the second season that I have provided coaching clinics for the Flag Football Fanatics folks.  99 coaches have been exposed to the Hustle & Attitude philosophy as it applies to their specific league.  I look forward to spreading the word about best practices in providing positive experiences for children in youth sports through more clinics and this blog (and maybe a book!).

Awesome display of sportsmanship!

I absolutely love stories like this. This young man understands the ‘Attitude’ part of Hustle & Attitude. 

http://usatodayhss.com/2017/baseball-player-in-georgia-delays-game-to-comfort-opponent-whose-father-died

I would imagine the young man has had great adults involved in his youth sports career that helped foster in him the attitude of sportsmanship he displayed before the game. 

Miller Time! Excellent Book about Great Coaching Family

miller-time-book While on a campus visit with my son to the University of Dayton in January, I came across a book titled Miller Time – Coach John Miller’s Story.  I was drawn to the title recognizing that Archie Miller is the head coach of the University of Dayton men’s basketball team and his brother Sean Miller is the head coach of the University of Arizona men’s basketball team.  My son has been accepted to attend University of Dayton and I am a University of Arizona alum.  Reading the back cover and the foreward (by another successful college basketball coach – John Calipari), I learned the book is about John Miller, the coaching Millers’ father.

John Miller is himself a legendary high school basketball coach in western Pennsylvania.  Over 600 career wins; 4 Pennsylvania state championships; runner-up once; 8 Western Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic League Championships; 17 section championships; a .700 career winning percentage; and a record 111 consecutive section wins from 1990-1999.

The book is the story of a coach whose dedication to and caring for young people has touched the lives of hundreds in Western Pennsylvania.  The accomplishments, both on and off the court, of Coach Miller’s former players are a testament to his philosophy and style being more about developing the whole person and not just the basketball player.

I read the book because of the connection of the two coaches – one at my son’s soon-to-be school and the other at my alma mater.  I also expected to find some nuggets with respect to my Hustle & Attitude youth coaching philosophy.  I was not disappointed.  Here are some excellent pieces of advice for youth sports coaches from Coach Miller:

  • HUSTLE – “No matter what you’re trying to do, you have to just keep working.  You just have to keep banging away.  If it’s meant to be, it’ll come.  I wish there was more to it than that [keeping a positive attitude and working hard], but there’s not.  That’s it”.
  • ATTITUDE – “You never whine about calls.  You never celebrate on the court.  And you retrieve the ball for the referee with respect even if he is the worst referee in the world.  You hold yourself responsible no matter what.  No excuses”.
  • ATTITUDE – “A great mental attitude will overcome physical ability”.
  • “My yearly objective was always to get the maximum out of the total squad”
  • “Try to stay away from talking about winning.  The emphasis should be on working hard every day”.

Miller has a video series and runs clinics called Drill for Skill.  The core values are:

  1. Every child is an athlete.  And every child can become a better athlete.
  2. Talent is never enough.  With few exceptions, the best players are the hardest workers.
  3. We are teachers.  And the court is our classroom.
  4. Relentless focus on the fundamentals is the pathway to mastery.
  5. We know we’re not important enough to change the world, but we’re important enough to change someone’s world.
  6. Our lives are a series of habits.  It’s important to develop good ones at an early age.
  7. Trust.  It’s everything.

These values are great advice for coaches at all levels.  And probably my favorite quote from the book:  “Emphasize enthusiasm, hustle, and having a class attitude on the floor”.  You can probably guess why.

5 Reasons for Equal Playing Time (Plus 1!)

I came across this blog post over on League Network about whether children should get equal playing time in youth sports.  I agree with all 5 reasons Erik offers – and more.  The Hustle & Attitude philosophy advocates for each child playing an equal amount and getting the opportunity to play multiple positions.

  1. As Erik suggests, equal playing time allows each child on the team to grow; the skilled and less skilled alike.  It was always my plan to make sure that each player was better by the end of the season.  This can only happen if the player gets a chance to improve, in practices and games.
  2. The point about the children recognizing preferential treatment is a good one.  In addition to that position, it has been my experience that, particularly in recreational leagues, rather than resenting the lack of playing time for themselves, the really skilled players actually root for the less skilled players to do well when they get in the game.  I’ll never forget the reaction on my team’s bench when one of our 9-year olds got his first hit in a baseball game…you’d have thought we just won the World Series!
  3. Along those lines, getting his chance to hit just like the rest of his teammates no doubt contributed to the confidence of the player in the example above.
  4. The issue of money is a fact.  I have written before that one of the key distinctions between a recreational league and a travel / select league is that the parents that pay for their child to play expect that their child will play.
  5. I am happy to be associated with two leagues that include equal playing time rules:  BCNaz Kidz Basketball and Flag Football Fanatics flag football.  Where it isn’t in the league rules, Hustle & Attitude coaches make sure it happens anyway.

And for the plus 1…how about because it’s the right thing to do?!?!  Erik doesn’t mention this, but I firmly believe that, for children in recreational sports, equal playing time should be the rule and not the exception for all the reasons he mentions in his post and because it’s simply what’s best for the young athletes.

Leave a comment or send me a note – I’d love to hear what you think.

The Future of Youth Football

I came across an article in the New York Times about USA Football experimenting with what they are calling ‘Modified Tackle’ football for youth.  Then again this morning, Nancy Armour wrote about it in the USA Today.  I think this is a great idea.  I have written extensively about youth football – Hustle & Attitude is about providing positive  youth sports experiences for kids; and this includes safety as the minimum requirement.  Where football is concerned, the question of safety has been paramount over the last 18-24 months.   What USA Football is proposing is a step towards making youth football safer – which will make for a more positive experience for children.


Here are my thoughts concerning the NYT article:

  • Is this a crisis situation for football?  Participation among 9-12 yr olds is down 20% since 2009…that’s 20% fewer future high school players.  Where do 99+% of NFL players come from?  College football.  Where do 99+% of college players come from?  High school football.  Make no mistake, if kids stop playing high school football, the NFL pipeline will dry up.  Particularly in light of safer (at least statistically) alternatives like lacrosse and soccer (especially with the new rule eliminating heading below the age of 10).
  • To me, the only criticism detractors can offer is something along the lines of ‘it’s not real football‘…OK, and?  My reaction is similar to my disbelief with baseball coaches who balk at the institution of pitch counts for high schoolers…seriously?!? With all the data we have; doesn’t it just make too much sense to err on the side of caution?
  • What an interesting dichotomy in the responses from the heads of USA Football and Pop Warner football.  I  agree with the director of USA Football that “this is the future of the game”.  And on the flip side…what a very short-sighted view on the part of the Executive Director of Pop Warner.  Seems to me; one of them gets it and one doesn’t.
  • The comparison to youth baseball is a solid one.  Armour emphasizes this point in her USA Today article.  Currently, youth football doesn’t have a similar progression from t-ball to coach pitch to regular baseball with the pitching mound and base path distance differences…yet.  Flag football and this ‘modified tackle’ format might be the beginnings of this.  Something like going from flag football to this new modified tackle to real tackle at high school sounds reasonable.  See my previous post about the idea of ‘hit counts’ for another corollary to youth baseball that could apply to youth football.
  • I really appreciate seeing a recommendation for the children to play multiple positions.  This is a cornerstone of the Hustle & Attitude philosophy.
  • I’m not sure what to make of Jon Gruden’s comments.  There are a lot of smart people out there suggesting kids shouldn’t play tackle football (at least until high school) – I like to think I am one of them.  I agree with Terry O’Neil that youth shouldn’t play tackle until high school.  However, I don’t think Gruden is using the term ‘genius’ in a complementary way.  I’ve heard him hype football as a great game and enthusiastically support the game on Monday Night Football, but his comments here feel like at worst, those of a corporate shill mouthing the words of the bosses who have a game to protect and sell or, at best unenlightened, ignorant, and/or generally dismissive of the current realities.

Finally, a note of concern from the article:  the national rollout is several years away?!?  What are we waiting for; another 20% of children to lose interest in football?  This is a necessary move in the right direction that should be implemented immediately.

6 Steps to Success for High School Student Athletes

6-steps-book-coverMy dad bought me a book about preparing high school athletes for success.  The book is called 6 Steps to Success for High School Student-Athletes and is written by Alonzo Barkley.  Barkley is a former college and professional basketball player that now coaches high school in Alabama.

Although my focus is on youth recreational sports – essentially for children younger than high school age, many of the recommendations Barkley makes in his book are still appropriate.  As a Christian myself, I also appreciate the value Barkley places on his faith in becoming a successful student athlete.  The 6 steps are:

  1. Placing God First
  2. Learning How to Respect Authority
  3. Competing Academically
  4. Falling in Love with the Sport
  5. How to Beware of Distractions from Destiny
  6. Handling Success When it Comes

Steps numbers 2, 4, and 6 are right in line with the Hustle & Attitude methodology.  Reading the book reminded me that, even though most youth recreational sports leagues aren’t directly associated with a school; the children that participate are still students and are therefore student-athletes.  I will write more in the future about my beliefs with respect to youth recreational sports and the young student-athlete.  Step 5 is probably more geared towards a high school athlete in terms of the types of distractions that might tempt a student-athlete.

I recommend this book for middle school and early high school athletes and the coaches and parents who mentor them.  There is practical and inspirational guidance that can help them all succeed in sports, academics, and more.